Tour of Attica: March 14-18

My apologies all for the long delay in posting. I had to go back to the US for a bit for a family thing and then I was on an archaeological tour of Attica.  Below are some of the pictures from that tour. The tour is part of a collaborative class with both ACG students and Duke students participating. They have various digital history projects that they are creating which require them to have a fairly extensive knowledge of the terrain in and around Athens. So the tour took them (and me) to the major points and across major roads around Attica.

View from Penteli (480x640) View from Mt. Penteli looking over Athens. Mt. Penteli is the mountain from where the Parthenon marble was extracted.
Quarry Road_Penteli (480x640)The remains of the quarry road that the workers would have hauled the large marble stones down.
The memorial of the turning point in the battle at Marathon (Persians vs. Greeks). The monument (a sin269 (2) (480x640)gle Ionic column) was erected in the 460s to coincide with the establishment of an annual funeral for the Marathonian dead.
Athenian Tumulus_Marathon (640x480)The tumulus where the Athenians who died in the battle of Marathon (490 BCE) would have been buried. A more elaborate monument to the war dead was erected in Athens proper.
Also at Marathon is a sanctuary to the Egyptian gods, who were a regular part of Greek cult practice. Not much of this site remains but the base of what was presumaSanctuary of the Egyptian Gods_Maratho (640x480)bly an Egyptian style pyramid and several entrance statues like you see here. There was also an extensive Roman bath complex built by Herodes Atticus, who was sort of the Bill Gates of his day. He is also known to have put up the funding for the Herodion, a theater that sits at the base of the Acropolis in Athens proper.
These are the remains of an extensive complex to Demeter at Eleusis. In the center of the image is the telesterion where the mysteries of Demeter (Eleusinian Mysteries) were practiced in secret. Demeter was a goddess of agriculture so the thinking is that the secret rituals had to do with agriculture in some way.View of Telesterion_Eleusis (640x480)

Demeter_Eleusis (480x640)I think this has become my new favorite statue. It is a statue of Demeter which seems to function almost as a column and was found in the Eleusinian complex.  You’ll notice the basket on her head and the iconography on the side of the basket which has the symbols of agriculture.

 

 

 

Fortification Bastion at ErythraiFortification walls and the bastions at Erythrai. This particular site in antiquity was frequently fought over by both the Thebans and the Athenians. It sits at the top of a mountain giving it views to the south which in antiquity would have been mostly Athenian farmland. To the north are the mountains leading into Boeotian territory.
Fortification wall and reconstructed bastions at Agosthina. This particular set of fortifications was meant to protect the interior from attack by sea as Agosthina was a coastal town. Today, it is a seaside resort for Athenians in the summer.Fortifications_Agosthina (480x640)
The stoa (the remains of which you see here) at Brauron is unique as it contained mostly dining rooms rather than storefronts.  It is part of a larger complex which includes a temple to Artemis and the ‘grave’ of the mythological figure Iphigenia.Stoa at Brauron (480x640)
This is the deme theater at Thorikos, which was a mining site for Athens. Here they mined for silDeme Theater at Thorikos (640x480)ver with which Athenian coinage was made.  This particular theater shows how the ancient Athenians used the terrain for their needs. It also is evidence that perhaps early orchestras (the floor area at center of theater) were not circular or semi-circular but rather polygonal. If you look in the distance across the water, you can see an island. This island was a prison island where the military junta which ran Greece from 1967-1974 imprisoned their political enemies, most notably those who were politically liberal.

 

There is something positively breathtaking about the temple of Poseidon at Sounion.  It sits literally on the edge of a cliff at the southernmost point of Attica. Temple of Poseidon_Sounion (640x480)
View at Sounion (480x640)The view from the temple of Poseidon at sunset.

 

 

Ulsan, South Korea

Arriving in Ulsan five days ago has left me with plenty of time to feel like I have become a native to the city. Although I know this is highly untrue, the city offers a homey, secure feeling that you would find in Maryville. However, Ulsan is very different than our tiny Midwest town.

Ulsan is a large metropolitan city located on the southern penesula of South Korea. There are 1.2 million people who call the city home with roughly thirty thousand of them being international. The locals are friendly and understanding of the language barrier that is between us and they are willing to help (we even had a lady call her daughter to translate for us so we could order dinner)! They care much about their appearance and the persona they put off outside their homes. Due to this there are many beauty stores and salons and several coffee shops on each block.

One of the major differences between here and home is that there seems to be hardly any traffic laws. Speeding, cutting people off, making u-turns in the middle of traffic. You name the law and someone Ian probably breaking it. Not to mention that side streets have parking on either side of a one lane street that traffic flows both directions at the same time while sharing the road with pedestrians. Unlike at home people do not stop for those walking!!

While I feel very safe and at home already, some of the other exchange students from California and myself have joked that this is the Asian Los Angeles. The brightly lighted store fronts mixed with the array of people walking the strip makes for a comforting feeling you’d find in the American city.

The past five days have been wonderful and I cannot wait to see what the rest of my time here has to offer. Photos to come next post!

다음 번엔 클로이 (Until next time, Chloe)

More on Athens

My apologies for the delay in posting. The weather the last two weeks has not been all that conducive to getting around and about.

American School of Classical Studies in Athens & the Wiener Laboratory

The American School of Classical Studies in Athens is just about as close to a mecca as Classicists get.  It has two substantial libraries: one dedicated to the ancient world (Blegen) and one dedicated to the early modern and modern (Gennadius).  They are amazing facilities. But in the last two weeks I was lucky enough to get a tour of the Wiener Laboratory of Archaeology.  It was an amazing experience. I was able to hold the bones of a young child from an excavation in Boeotia dating to the Byzantine era. The tour included an introduction to all the newest methods and technologies available in the field. It also included discussions with some of the Fellows there including one who does archaeo-volcanology, specifically the super-volcano that lies in the eastern mediterranean beneath the island of Thera (Santorini). As the fellow was explaining his research he talked a bit about why it was relevant to a contemporary audience: climate change.  His research deals with volcanic eruptions thousands of years ago and tracing the impact of those eruptions.  His research does prove that climate change is not just a modern phenomenon; it has been happening for a very, very long time.

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National Archaeological Museum

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I also visited the National Archaeological museum.  Under ordinary circumstances, this museum is phenomenal but because it is off season and because of the economic situation, a good half of the museum was closed. This 009 (600x800)unfortunate circumstance meant that I did not get to see some of my favorite statues, notable the Leonine Alexander.   The museum was, however, having two special exhibits, one on the Odyssey and one on the hidden holdings of the museum, which included a piece dating to 7000 BCE (image on the right).

 

Here are just a few of the more famous holdings:

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On a more mundane note, I opted to take the bus down to the museum rather than the metro so I could see more of the city and its northern suburbs.  Athens’ buses are actually kind of awesome. They are clean and have video screens of the route so you can kind of follow along.  On a sunny 60 degree day,  traffic was…interesting.  Cars, trucks, bikes, motorcycles do not seem to follow any particular set of rules. The only rule seems to be “do what you have to do but don’t hit anyone else.” It can make being a pedestrian a rather challenging feat. I am not familiar with Athens’ traffic laws, but I do not get the impression that pedestrians have the right of way. So if you are ever in Athens and you are walking about, yield to traffic and look both ways (even on a one way street) more than once.

Week 2

This week’s images:

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IMG_3102Just your average sidewalk on campus here. The campus sits on the side of what amounts to a mountain (more of a large foothill by US standards though).

 

 

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Soccer practice on the field, which is in the middle of campus. And, yes, they do call it soccer here. I made the mistake of assuming they called it football like in the UK and was promptly corrected: “Only the snobbish Brits call it football.” (Greeks here are not at all happy about Brexit by the way).

 

 

So I have now been through two full weeks of classes and one major historical event.

The DEREE Classroom.  The classroom experience here is actually not all that different from Northwest.  Students show up late, do not read the syllabus, have their cell phones out, etc.  However, they do appear for the most part to be more engaged.  I have a class of 19 in Western Civ I this semester. And of those 19, I would say a good half actively ask questions and provide responses. Granted, this could be an anomaly here and could simply be the particular group of students that I have.

The students here do not typically use laptops to take notes so I have been told. I asked some colleagues because none of my students do, which surprised me.  It raises an interesting question for me about Northwest since we provide laptops. What if the reason that NWMSU students take notes on the laptops is because they are provided in the first place?  Would we still see as many students taking notes electronically, if we did not provide laptops?  While at NW, I did not typically see that many students using a non-university issued computer, but that may be because I tend to stay in the Valk bubble.  It’s just a question and by no means a condemnation of the policy because, for me, the benefits of students having a laptop outside the classroom far exceeds any criticisms or I may have about the policy or about in-class electronic note-taking.

I’ve had enough conversations with various faculty here to know that they are experiencing some of the same challenges that we in the states do. One in particular struck me: faculty have to pay for their own printing costs. Yes, you read that right. Faculty here have to put out their own $$ to print/copy their exams, handouts, etc. Boy, was that an eye-opener. I will concede that the class sizes here are nowhere near as large as some of ours can get. I think the largest is 60, but I will have to double check on that.  Here, faculty are required to consider an eBook before a print text and if they reject the eBook, they have to have solid pedagogical grounds (which from what I gather is a great deal of work to show).  All faculty here are also required to serve on their version of Faculty Senate–all faculty not just elected representatives from departments.  So, my dear colleagues experiencing massive budgetary constraints at Northwest, be grateful.

I will be experiencing my first full faculty meeting this week, which I am not required to attend. My colleague here, Liz, says it will simply be the faculty nodding and smiling at the administration and then complaining (I had to clean up her language here) on the way back to their various offices. But, in an effort to experience everything possible here, I am going.

Food For Thought.  DEREE, the school I’m at here in Athens, has an interesting scheduling system that generates quite a bit of student and faculty engagement. They have what is known as Activity Hour which is actually 2 hours every day, from 1:30-3:30 where no classes or office hours are scheduled.  Instead, the university uses the time for interesting lectures (kind of like our Distinguished Lecture Series) as well as departmental meetings and faculty development. In fact, I am going to a lecture on diversity, equity, and inclusion practices in the classroom next week.  There is another speaker, the Greek ambassador to Israel, coming soon to talk about the state of politics in the Middle East. From what I can tell, there are on average, about 10-20 special events like this a week and they are highly attended.  I went to one on Bronze Age Hellenic pottery this week that easily had about 50-60 people there–both students and faculty and even a few community members.

I’m interested in what my colleagues, administrators, and students think of this. So if you have a though, shoot me an email or post a comment.  Something like this at NW would not necessarily need to be two hours or even every day as it is here, but it is thought-provoking since every fall we parcel out time solely for University Seminar. Thus, we already have a mechanism that has blocked off time.

Major Historical Event.  I do not plan to get too partisan on here as it really is not the place.  But in this one instance, it is relevant to my experience abroad.  I attended the Women’s March on Washington-Athens last Saturday as so many did around the world. There were not as many people there as other places but there were about a thousand, I would guess, of all ages, gender identities, ethnicities, etc..  There were the usual speeches and some glorious signs, the subjects of which ranged from general human rights to women’s rights to immigration rights (a big deal in Greece right now since they are absorbing a good many Syrian refugees). There was a point when I realized that the march was perhaps not appropriately named; though, I do realize the origins of the whole thing stemmed from the women’s movement. (I would post pictures but my camera on my phone went wacky, so my apologies.) The march, for me, was not about the current US President at all. Instead, for me, it was about camaraderie and hope. The men and the women in attendance told stories of oppression which elicited sadness, despair. These were particularly heartbreaking because of the current economic struggles here. I would tell you a few but I don’t think I could get through it emotionally to type it right now as it is still a bit raw, but maybe when I get back home I can share.  There were also those that reminded us that the fact that so many showed up–in Athens and around the globe–meant that we were not alone in that oppression.  There was a particular moment that stuck with me and it was a moment in silence with only the sounds of traffic passing by.  At sunset-already glorious with the Parthenon lit up in the distance–everyone raised their cellphones (and for some their cigarette lighters) skyward, each individual cellphone light merging with the ones around it creating a glow. It was symbolic. It was beautiful. It was light victorious over darkness.  It was hope.

 

Week 1

January 19, 2017

So, I have been here in Athens (Agia Paraskevi, to be precise) for a full week now. I’ve spent the week getting my bearings in this delightful neighborhood which is roughly the size of Marvyille but with a distinct urban feel.  You certainly know when you are here that you are in the capital due to the city buses and tons more cars (and their honking horns, oh the horns!) than I ever see in Maryville on an average day.

The people in this middle class neighborhood are friendly, wanting to talk about all kinds of things. Although, I must say I have had more conversations about gun control and American politics than I thought I would have.  The Greeks I have talked to do NOT support the current direction of American politics.  And, I can see why. One of the residence hall directors told me that the kind of thinking that is pervading the current American discourse is what led to the decisions that were made in the 1980s and 1990s which ultimately led to the Greek economic collapse in 2004 and 2008.  [A layman’s summary of the situation can be found in a 2016 New York Times article: Here]

IMG_3071Speaking of that collapse, evidence of struggle is prevalent along the main street leading to the ACG campus (Agiou Ioannou). There are empty store fronts and empty restaurants. On Saturdays, there is the occasional pan-handler which so far has only been elderly women.  But the one thing that clearly has endured the economic struggle: coffee shops.  I counted no less than 20 coffee shops within a 6 block radius of my apartment. And, yes, there is a Starbuck’s on campus. The typical Greek breakfast is a coffee or two and cigarettes. Not healthy, I know.  As I partake in neither, I am sticking to fresh baked tyropita (cheese pie) and frosted flakes.

Despite the evidence of decline, there is though a sense of recovery here. There is new construction going up and new businesses opening.  The neighborhood instituted a discount day at some of the local stores which is really not all that different from our Maryville Chamber bucks program. I’ve been informed that I really need to attend those sales because you can get designer fashion for about 75% off.  Since I already went through a pair of running shoes while here, I’m clearly going to have to “suffer” through this shopping experience. The sales extravaganza is meant to keep money circulating in Greece so that taxes drawn from it can be used for local needs like infrastructure, healthcare, education, etc. It’s the Greek equivalent of the “Buy American” slogan we have all heard before. And in this neighborhood, it seems to be working. There are signs of hope. [Granted the EU is talking about giving more bailout money to Greece so that helps]

IMG_3072For the presidential inauguration tomorrow, I plan to go down to the city center and spend time on the Acropolis to reflect on the evolution of democratic principles.  Saturday, Athenian women are participating in the Women’s March on Washington movement by marching from the US embassy to the Acropolis.  I think I will go down and be a part of history.

 

Mai Pen Rai

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As most already know, Asia is known for its exquisite temples and the history behind them. I did not realize how many temples I was going to see when I got here. But after spending almost four months here already, viewing temples is just another part of daily life here for me. I see them everywhere, driving into the city, around the city, in local parks, national forests, etc.

I visited Ayutthaya which is the ancient capital of the Kingdom of Siam, before Bangkok became the capital city of Thailand. Ayutthaya is located 80 kilometers north of Bangkok and transportation is simple to get there. I paid 60 baht ($2.00) to catch a ride in a van. Ayutthaya was a prosperous international trading port from 1350 to 1767 when it was razed by the Burmese. Ayutthaya contains palaces, Buddhist temples, monasteries and statues. Arriving there, my friend and I noticed that there were no taxis in sight except tuk tuks who were only trying to scam you. Since Ayutthaya is huge and takes more than one day to see all the ruins and temples, we decided to rent a motorbike for a 100 baht all day pass ($3.30). It was much more enjoyable to ride around on a motorbike than to sit in on a tour with a large group of other people. This way we could visit certain temples at our own pace, and have a lax schedule where we could see whatever we wanted for however long we wanted. It was unbelievable walking around, I could definitely still feel the history here. The temples and ruins were amazingly beautiful and so intricate. It is so hard to wrap my mind around how these huge stone buildings were built so long ago with no modern technology.

As I mentioned before, stray dogs are everywhere in Thailand. Some nice, some not so nice. I had a little run-in with a stray dog while touring on our motorbike. We took a road that we thought was leading to the next temple, but turns out it was a dead end road leading to a man’s house. As we were driving up and quickly realizing that we were not on the correct road, a stray dog came running up to us barking and growling. Coincidentally our motorbike died right as this was happening. I have never been more scared in my life (this almost beats the first time I saw a gecko in our dorm kitchen). This was just our luck: taking the wrong street that lead to a dead end and having a stray dog attack us right as our motorbike died. Nevertheless, we quickly started back up the motorbike and zoomed off as fast as we could. I was sitting on the back laughing so hard and also still shaking at the fact my life flashed before my eyes! The rest of the trip we decided to only stay on main roads and avoid stray dogs as much as possible.

A few weeks after my visit to Ayutthaya, I took a trip to Chiang Mai, a city located on the northwestern corner of Thailand. The main reason we traveled here was for Loy Krathong, translating into English as “to float a basket”. This is also known to westerners as the Lantern Festival. This festival takes place on more than one day. One day boats are released to get rid of all your bad karma throughout the year, and most make a wish as their boat is released. We were very lucky to get to create our own boats with our hostel owner. He cut slabs of bamboo trunk as the center base, and picked loads of banana leaves to decorate our boats with. It was such a fun experience to get to learn about this holiday and be able to make it more meaningful by creating our own boats rather than spending money on one that another person created. We went to the river in Chiang Mai as a group, and one by one we released our boats making wishes and letting go of all of our bad karma. The next day was the releasing of the lanterns, symbolizing the same sort of idea: releasing karma and creating a clean slate for the year to earn good merit. Due to my class schedule and tests, I had to leave a day early and miss the releasing of the lanterns. I was pretty bummed about it, since it is such an amazing event to witness, but I was fortunate enough to look out the window and see the thousands upon thousands of lanterns floating in the sky as I was going home on a bus.

 

Laos, The Hidden Gem

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“The best trips are usually unplanned, random, spontaneous and most importantly fun.”

 

This is the most accurate quote for my trip to Laos last weekend. Two friends and I last minute (and I mean the day of) booked a night bus to the capitol city: Vientiene, Laos. Our friend Logan had just visited Laos a few weekends before and told us all the amazing things he did and saw, so I knew I had to travel there. From Vientiene we took a van 3 hours through the windy underdeveloped roads to a little backpacker town named Vang Vieng. Laos opened my eyes in ways I never thought possible. Coming to Thailand I thought it was pretty underdeveloped, but Laos took it to a whole new level. I saw many adults walking around barefoot and ripped clothing selling fruit or little trinkets they made themselves just to put dinner on the table at the end of the day. Just the venue of the village showed you how underdeveloped the country was with the shacks serving as houses, dirt roads, and the amount of poverty I saw. But despite all of this, I met the most genuine and happy people I have ever met in my life here. This trip to Laos really made me take a step back and realize how easy we have things in the States. We take even the simplest things for granted and Laos really taught me to become more aware of the way I live life and that the things I worry about are minuscule compared to the things going on there.

I took a 3 ½ mile bike ride through the village to a blue lagoon at the base of a mountain. As I was biking through the village I could see very clearly inside the houses because none of them had doors. One house I remember vividly had only two blankets on the floor serving as a bed, and a fan. Nothing else. I also saw the owner of the house boiling water outside over a fire since none of the water there was safe to drink. This is when I really got a sense of the culture here and how I wanted to show my respect here and prove myself not to be the typical American that everyone has a stereotype for. The woman noticed me biking by and gave me the most beautiful and happy smile and waved, and I smiled back and greeted her by saying “sabadee.”

Children were walking back home from school on the side of the road and that showed me how safe this village is. One thing I kept thinking about when I saw all these things was, “wow. What a way of life. What an amazing way to grow up.” Children were actually enjoying themselves playing soccer with each other and running around having fun outside. Today that’s becoming very uncommon back in the states.

After the blue lagoon we biked back to our hostel located on the main road of Vang Vieng. We went to bed pretty early because we planned a pretty exciting and packed day the next day. When we woke up, we ate breakfast and got picked up by the bus that took us about 30 minutes up the mountain to a spot by a river where we went tubing through the caves. This was one of the scariest yet most exciting things I’ve done for the fact of my huge fear of being in water when it’s dark. The cave was pitch black, and the only way we could see where we were going was from a head light our tour guide provided us with. At first I was doing alright and not really thinking about the fact that I had no idea what was swimming under me until I felt something slimy and warm slide across my back. I lost it after that. My tour guide couldn’t quit laughing at how scared I was how much I was freaking out. I tried lying on top of my tube to where no parts of my body touched the water until we reached sunlight again.

After our tube tour through the cave we stopped for lunch before our next adventure. We were sitting on a big rock near the river watching 5 little boys play in the water and catch fish with a water bottle. Someone handed them a plate of rice and all of them were fighting over it and scarfing it down. When I saw this my heart fell to my stomach and I thought about anything I could do to give them more food. My friends and I had leftover bread and bananas from our lunch so I grabbed them from our table and brought them down to the boys. They snatched them up so quick I don’t think they even had a chance to see what kind of food it was. This brought tears to my eyes. It immediately made me regret every bite I had just taken of my own lunch because there are others that need it way more than I did.

After we hung out with the boys for a little bit we had to leave for our next adventure: kayaking. This was my first time kayaking so I was pretty nervous but I was in the kayak with my friend Sami who was pretty much an expert kayaker so that helped a lot. The view while kayaking was unbelievable. Huge mountains in the backgrounds with beautiful trees lining the river. The water was so clear and in some shallow spots you could see all of the colorful rocks beneath.

We ended our trip with a hot air balloon ride over Vang Vieng before catching our bus back to Bangkok. This was absolutely breathtaking. It was completely silent and peaceful looking out at the mountains and village under us.

I will remember my trip to Laos and all the feelings I had and things I saw forever. This trip made me so thankful for all of the things I have and experiences I get to do. It also taught me to chill out and not worry about the things that I think are a big deal because there are much bigger things others are worrying about and I saw that first hand.

XoXo, Olivia

Coming Soon….

I am not scheduled to arrive in Athens, Greece until January 12, 2017.  Check back in the new year for accounts of my experiences.

Until then, here is a picture from my last trip to Athens.Parthenon

 

Mai Pen Rai

This was taken at the Veggie Festival in Chinatown, Bangkok. All the foods here are so unique and the way they prepare the meals is also so fun to watch.

If you look close, you still won’t be able to find me! This is a picture of all the international students studying this semester at Mahidol University. On this day we each planted a tree to celebrate the 70th Anniversary of the King’s reign, and also to celebrate the 84th birthday of the Queen.

Just a little scenic photo of an island off the eastern seaboard on the Gulf of Thailand, known as Koh Phangan.

 

Sawadee ka from Bangkok, Thailand!

My time here continues to be more and more amazing everyday, and “mai pen rai” is still apart of my daily outlook on life and how to handle any situation here.

Coming here I was told to take notice of everyone’s happiness and smiley faces and WOW everyone was right. Thai people are so happy and welcoming. Everyone looks at me with curious eyes because they know I am not from here, wondering what I am doing here, but they are always smiling. I am nowhere near fluent in the Thai language, but when they see me trying to speak in Thai they love it.

I would like to talk about the little things here I have noticed that make this country so unique and amazing. There are stray dogs EVERYWHERE. I mean everywhere. That was one of things I noticed most when I came here. 15-60% of stray dogs in Thailand have rabies, so that was one of the first rules P’A gave us: DO NOT PET THE DOGS. It is such a sad and unique thing to see, because most of them are so cute and look so nice so you would think a little love would brighten their day, but that is not the case.

Another unique and awesome thing I have noticed here in Thailand is the amount of geckos there are, inside and outside. One of the first nights I was here I went into our kitchen area to fill up my water bottle, and when I turned on the light 2 little geckos ran up the wall. Nothing has scared me more than when I saw those little things! At that time I did not know it was normal for geckos to climb walls especially inside, so that took some getting used to. But now it is one of those little things that I will definitely miss seeing when I return home.

You learn very quickly (and I mean within the first few hours) that bug spray will be your best friend here. With the immense amount of humidity, and the fact that we are in a tropical jungle, mosquitoes are everywhere. Dengue and Zika are the two main viruses you can catch from a mosquito bite, so I have been sure to keep bug spray with me wherever I go. Although it is not a problem and probably won’t be for the rest of my time here I do not want to risk it.

But let’s talk about food, one of the best parts!

This is by far one the biggest things I am going to miss when I go home. Food here is amazing, Simpy Siam in Maryville doesn’t even begin to compare! It is also very cheap almost everywhere you go. Across the street from my dorm is a little family owned, in-house restaurant that I could definitely survive off of for the rest of my life. We call her pasta lady. She has everything from pad thai, rice with vegetables or meat, sandwiches with crab, ham, chicken, or tuna, multiple kinds of spaghetti, and salads. A meal here costs 30-40 baht which is right around $1 USD.

Down the street right next to our ISA office is a little restaurant called Little Girl. It has many more Thai food options for around the same price as pasta lady, anywhere from 30-60 baht. Also very amazing place to eat. It is cheaper to eat out every meal than to buy groceries, which sounds unhealthy, but there are so many healthy options and restaurants to pick from. Our school has a great cafeteria as well, called the atrium canteen. Meals here are also 30 baht, and you can choose from so many different Thai cuisines. Smoothies are a huge thing here in Thailand, also very healthy and very cheap. There are some American foods that I miss having in my day-to-day life (CHEESE!!!), but I know one day I’ll be home eating all of the things I miss here, thinking “man I really miss those amazing Thai cuisines, and pasta lady!”

One important and culturally relevant event that happened last week was the passing of Thailand’s King Bhumibol Adulyadej. Until his death he was the longest reigning monarch in the world. He reigned over this amazing country since he was 18, a total of 70 years. The loss of the nation’s father has taken a huge toll on the Thai people. A national broadcast has announced a year of mourning has begun. I have noticed so many changes in the culture and the vibes in general here. Many businesses, restaurants, clubs, etc. have willingly closed down for the time being. For the first few days, music was not allowed to be played, and celebrations of any kind have ceased. One place I noticed this the most was on the BTS sky train. Usually it is a very loud, energetic ride every time I take it, but ever since the passing of the King it is completely silent. There wasn’t any music playing or any adds on the televisions. Another thing I have noticed is the change of wardrobes: everyone is wearing neutral colors, white, black, or gray. It is so unique to be here during this emotional time, and I just try to remain respectful and show my condolences for the Thai people. It is also very eye opening to be here for such a major event, because I saw with my own eyes how much it has impacted Thailand.

This event has made me appreciate Thailand in general so much, and I can only show my respect toward this culture and the people as much as possible. One goal of mine while here was to submerge myself into their culture in any shape or form, and I continue to learn new things everyday and look forward to meeting new Thai students and learning from them. Like I said in the beginning, this experience continues to be more and more amazing, all thanks to the Thai people, my director P’A, my fellow ISA friends, and everything else about this amazing country.

Sawadee ka and kop khun ka!

Olivia Herzberg